Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors

A Novel

eBook - 2019
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"Award-winning author Sonali Dev launches a new series about the Rajes, an immigrant Indian family descended from royalty, who have built their lives in San Francisco."--
Publisher: [S.l.] : HarperCollins, 2019
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780062839060
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: 3M Cloud Library

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GummiGirl
Oct 13, 2019

Of the several P & P retellings I've read, this was the most mouthwatering, if not the most faithful to the original. I did like what they did with Wickham.

JCLS_Ashland_Kristin Oct 03, 2019

Good fun for hard core Janeites. Probably best to skip on audio because the reader's British accents do not reflect the accents that would fit with the story.

JessicaGma Sep 03, 2019

Good attempt, but half baked at the end. I couldn't figure out who some of the characters were supposed to be in the story, like not in comparison to P&P, but who these names were supposed to be? A cousin? Why are you taking care of this person? Why is this relevant to the tale? I've read better.

v
VICTORIA SCOTT
Sep 01, 2019

Characters, plot, tension were all great. Too much time was spent on outlining bloodlines and the family's history to convey their legacy. More than a few times I found myself skipping paragraphs and pages of descriptions and flashbacks, just to get back to the present moment and dialogue.

RomanceAddict Jul 24, 2019

Review excerpt: "Those familiar with author Sonali Dev know that her books involve a lot of food, complicated family issues, and angst. 'Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors' has all of these qualities, but the angst overwhelmed the romance to the point where I didn’t believe in the happy ending. I did, however, want to eat ALL the food."

https://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/reviews/pride-prejudice-and-other-flavors-by-sonali-dev/

debwalker Jul 16, 2019

Reimagining the classic P&P story (never grows stale) in contemporary times--this time in a family drama featuring an immigrant Indian family in modern-day San Francisco, Calif.

s
spieters
Jun 26, 2019

Great twists on the classic, both with gender roles (the heroine fulfills traditional Darcy role) and racism (genuine and engaging touches of black lives matter, complicated by many shades of colour.) My only hesitation was the family background profiles at the beginning, but they all paid off by the end of the story. This writer has heart, and her characters develop and grow on you. Recommended for romance readers who want something more thoughtful, but don't expect literary fiction.

DCLadults Jun 25, 2019

A New & Noteworthy pick. A "Pride and Prejudice" remix with an Indian American family. Ever thought of Wickham as an evil blonde woman with dreadlocks? Read it because it is just plain fun.

l
LeoLibros
May 25, 2019

Disappointed in this book these reasons:
1. Very loosely based on Pride and Prejudice, better have left out P&P of title really.
2. Unlike the original there was no chemistry between the protagonists
3. Darcy, is angry (in this book he is the poor one, low class etc), and he has none of the wit, charm, self-deprecation, or Humor that Elizabeth Bennet did.
4. The moment went he likes her does not seem natural, kinda forced
5. When they finally come together there is no sense of romance or excitement for the reader.

It was well written, I just did not care for Darcy.

a
AConsolver
May 16, 2019

3.5 Stars - I recommend if you enjoy contemporary fiction with a bit of romance. I thought this was a solid P&P retelling!

Dr. Trisha Raje, a brilliant surgeon, has a new case: a female artist with a brain tumor that will kill her if it stays, and blind her if it goes. When she decides to forfeit her life for a few more weeks of sight, Trisha teams up with the patient's brother to try to change her mind. DJ has left a very prestigious job in Paris to be here for his sister, and is running his own catering company. DJ finds Dr. Raje to be blunt, rude, and arrogant. Trisha finds DJ infuriating, aimless, and very attractive. The two have nothing in common except for his sister's future. Can they get her to choose the surgery and extend her life?

This book started out slowly for me, and I wasn't loving it quite as much as I expected at first. I loved the cooking aspect of the story, but I had a hard time connecting with the ultra-rich family at the forefront of the novel. The more time that DJ and Trisha spent together, however, the more I enjoyed it! I appreciated the modern day take on the classic story, and enjoyed seeing it through the lens of Indian American culture. I thought Dev approached modern day racial issues in a very thoughtful and powerful way. I'm so glad that she included this in this novel, as these topics are incredibly important. I thought that DJ and Trisha's moment where they really have it out was SO true to P&P! As the big conflict came to the forefront of the story I became very invested in what would happen. Overall I wish it would have been a bit more of a romance, because I wanted a little more tension between the characters. I liked the family parts, but I also wanted more of those relationships. It wasn't completely a family drama either. Because it doesn't fit a mold super well I'm having trouble rating it. I think I just wanted more cooking, more romantic tension, more charming family moments. I do think that this will all get more fleshed out as the series goes along. I'd be interested to read her other novels which I can only assume will be about Trisha's siblings. :)

Here are a few good quotes from this book:

"This is our home. This country is yours. Take everything you need. Give everything you have. From the beginning of time, humans have migrated. We've claimed the land and let it claim us. Don't ever fulfill anybody else's definition of your relationship with your country. How many generations ago their forefathers got here may be how some people stake their claim, but I stake min with how much I give. How wholly I love. This place called to me, I'm here, it's mine. And now, it's yours."

"The entire "what goes around comes around" thing was a backward view of karma. Karma was simply Sansrit for action, and the theory was that your actions are the only thing under your control, as opposed to the fruits of your actions, which are not. And since actions always bear fruit, you were better off focusing your energy on your own actions, rather than worrying about the results you wanted them to produce."

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